Cheap and Nasty

This town once boasted a shabby student bar called the Blarney Stone.  It specialized in pouring out shots of hard liquor, and was therefore popular among students who wished to get well oiled before suffering or perpetrating date rapes.  The shots, the dates, and the rapes, were uniformly cheap and nasty. Continue reading

The Israel Fetish

In this morning’s tranche of electronic notices, there was a message from the Program Assistant at the Hillel Center inviting students to apply for a subsidized excursion to Israel.  For less than one thousand dollars, it announced, students could enjoy ten days of “breathtaking views, immersive learning, and challenging discussion.”  This paragraph caught my eye: Continue reading

The Men Who Hate Destiny

In Oswald Spengler’s philosophy of history, every “historical people” is launched on its career by a “destiny-idea,” and it flourishes and has a history so long as it is occupied in “actualizing” this “idea into a living historical form” (1).  It is possession of (and by) a destiny-idea that raises a historical people above the grey morass of “historyless” peoples who simply exist through the endless “zoological” round of feeding, breeding, and death. Continue reading

Faster, Pussycat — Kill! Kill!

faster-pussycat-kill-kill-kill-blu-ray-movie-title

President Trump’s betrayal of his promise to repeal Obamacare has been disconcerting, as has the GOP’s recidivism in not sending to the CEO the blanket-repeal that they sent sixty times to his precursor in office.  No one objects to Obamacare relevantly.  That it is piss-poor healthcare is incidental.  The essential objection to the “law” is that a two-thousand-page “law” is a contradiction in terms.  A two-thousand-page “law” can be nothing other than a bludgeon of tyranny, to be used against the freedom – and the discretion, and the wisdom – of the people.  The Trumpmeister needs to live up to his campaign promise, the position to which he owes his election.  To quote the title of the Russ Meyer’s 1965 sexploitation movie: “Faster, Pussycat – Kill! Kill!”  Kill the “law” and start over.  Kill it.  Stomp it into the ground. Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, and kill.  Trump should throw away his Pussy Hat and act like a man.

Warren Farrell on Why Men Earn More

Warren Farrell’s book Why Men Earn More and What Women Can Do About It is a useful resource on the topic – a topic that surfaces most prominently on the eve of presidential elections only to disappear again afterwards. Shortly before the election, BBC America and MSNBC both ran stories on the wage gap on the same day, apropos nothing at all, seemingly as a conspiracy-theory-inducing coordinated action. The BBC made a special point of saying “for exactly the same jobs.” That is not remotely true. While individual instances of unfairness may be found, the 20% difference is due to factors like different occupational choices, choices of college majors, continuity of service, willingness to relocate, men who work full-time working more hours than women who work full-time, men commuting twice as far as women on average, and most particularly, women taking time off to raise children. Never married childless women earn more than never married men on average. Thomas Sowell points out that comparing “single” men and women is misleading because it includes divorced women who may have worked part-time or not at all while their children were young.

Last semester I had two students who insisted that the wage gap was the result of a pay differential within exactly the same jobs. When they hear such things on the supposedly reputable BBC and from politicians like Hillary Clinton it understandably sounds improbable that what they are hearing is a lie. One of the students sent some statistics to support her case which actually did no such thing.

The following is a summary of key arguments in Farrell’s book – Why Men Earn More published at The Brussels Journal, a topic Farrell started to explore when he wondered why employers would ever hire men if they could hire women to do the same job for 20% less.

Life in a Rat Ball

My daughter has a pet rat, an engaging little creature named Whiskers, who enjoys riding on her shoulder and hiding under her hair.  When Whiskers is not on my daughter’s shoulder, or in his cage, he bumps around the house in his rat ball.  This is a sphere of clear plexiglass into which he is inserted by way of a door, and which he can roll in whatever way he pleases by simply attempting to climb its walls. Continue reading

What the Well-Dressed Wolf is Wearing Nowadays

Vox Day draws our attention to a pair of wolves in sheep’s clothing, by which I mean humanitarian goops who pretend to be Catholic defenders of the faith (here). The first wolf is one Christopher Hale, executive director of Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good. We are not told with whom Mr. Hale’s Catholics are allied, but one suspects their allies include the long-suffering and maligned denizens of Hell. The second wolf is one Michael Sean Winters, a fellow at Catholic University’s Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies. This Institute studies Catholics in the same spirit that the National Cancer Institute studies Cancer. Continue reading

Woe is We (Man Up!)

Owing to a voluntary teaching overload, I have been too preoccupied to write for the Orthosphere of late.  My son yesterday observed that this might be causing some of you to worry that I had been gagged by masked ambassadors of the Black Block, and perhaps reduced to tapping out a cry for deliverance on a water pipe in a cell in the basement of Margaret Sanger Hall.  Fear not.  As a meager offering, I here post a letter I’ve just sent to the President of my professional association, in which I object to the unseemly hysteria that seems to have gripped the organization since the November election.  I don’t expect you to be interested in the arcane squabbles of geographers, but believe it touches on some points that may be of general interest.  If not, just treat it as a ping on the water pipe assuring you that I am still here. Continue reading