I guess every girl wants to be swept off her feet

I am perplexed by JMSmith’s suggestion that Nell Fenwick appreciated being tied to train tracks by Snidely Whiplash, and I’m sure I have no idea what Mr. Spock was insinuating when he said to Janice Rand that the evil transporter double Captain Kirk who had tried to rape her had “interesting” qualities.  But I can’t deny the evidence that they understand something about women that I don’t.

A while back, I got my older daughter (1st grade) a kid’s book on Greek myths.  I thought it would be the sort of thing she’d like, and she took to it right away.  Then she invented a new game.  She’s Persephone, I’m Hades, and I have to kidnap her and take her to my underworld kingdom.  Other stuff can happen too, but that’s the important part.  She’s had us do it lots of times.  After being recruited to play Demeter, her younger sister (preschool) realized that this is a fun game, and wanted to be Persephone too.  It’s strange, because all versions of the myth they’ve heard make it pretty clear that Persephone is not happy to be kidnapped and made Hades’ wife.  (In their games, she seems happy enough.)  Nor does Persephone in the myth do anything particularly exciting.  However, the myths are also clear that she is a particularly beautiful and desirable goddess, and my daughters are fascinated by pretty girls.

The only sense I can make of it is that girls can appreciate a genuine compliment.  A man who tells a girl she looks nice may just be being polite, but kidnapping is always a tribute in earnest.

10 thoughts on “I guess every girl wants to be swept off her feet

  1. Pingback: I guess every girl wants to be swept off her feet | Reaction Times

  2. Pingback: I guess every girl wants to be swept off her feet | @the_arv

  3. Hades is strong, he’s decisive, everyone else is terrified by him, but he loves you. What’s not to like about that? It’s maximal male power in thrall to the sexual power of an individual female.

  4. In the ancestral environment a woman who was disinclined to be kidnapped tended to not reproduce.

    Reflect on the typical barista with a Harvard degree in women’s studies and a hundred thousand dollars in college debt. Likely to have cats instead of children. If Islamic State is militarily victorious and auctions her off naked and in chains, likely to have seven children and twenty grandchildren. Hence the propensity to vote for more rapeugees.

    If not married by abduction or arrangement, likely to get stuck in defect/defect equilibrium. A man is unlikely to invest in her unless he can ensure that she and her kids stick around, and a man that can ensure that she and her kids stick around is unlikely to need to her consent.

    If consent required, withdrawal of consent possible. if withdrawal of consent possible, male investment in children with her will be less.

  5. My other story. The younger one learned by way of the older one a story that very much disturbed her. So the little sister insisted on playing a game where she is Eurydice, I am Orpheus, and I reclaim her from the land of the dead, being careful never to look behind me. After going through this a half dozen times, she had contented herself that that’s the way the story really ends.

    • Archaic marriage practice often included the ritual abduction of the bride from her family’s household by the groom, who would then take her to his family’s household, whereupon the signifying rite would have been completed and the marriage legally established. The same practice appears, in a more blatant way, in Homeric warfare. When Agamemnon finally conquers Troy, the Achaeans murder every last surviving adult male and then make off with the nubile women.

  6. Pingback: This Week In Reaction (2018/05/13) - Social Matter

  7. When William the Bastard sent his representative to ask the hand of Matilda of Flanders in marriage, she told the representative that she is too high-born to consider marrying a bastard. When William heard of this he rode from Normandy to Bruges, found Matilda on her to church, grabbed her hair and dragged her off her horse, and thrown down into the mud of the street, and then rode home without saying a word. Naturally, his father got angry and wanted to duel with William, but she settled the matter saying she wants to marry him now and nobody else.
    Eh. There are various ways you can take the red pill. Jim’s evolutionary account is useful precisely because it avoids having to give a humanistic (empathic, Verstehen) interpretation to a selection mechanism, but it is also the drawback, usually we want to understand human behavior in this humanistic sense.
    You can color your red pill purple by saying it is just women liking really strong compliments. The problem is, of course, women don’t seem to like normal compliments if they don’t like the man who gives it and they will generally despise a man who starts with compliments to try to win her love as a favour.
    My version of slightly less purple, more reddish pill tends to be that women like courage. But I know that is not really true either, after all all William risked was a duel with an old man, not really an act of extreme courage. There are situations where women like courage. But it is precisely when courage is used to save them from the dragon is what they don’t like. They like ther dragon more. Courage is part of why women find criminals sexy but not the whole picture, at the end of the day there is a real, true masochistic sentiment there that at some level wants to be hurt and controlled.

    • Indeed, if it had been some nobody mortal that had dared to lay hands on Persephone, things would have turned out differently. Women want to be desired by high-status men. I believe some in the “red pill” community have suggested that deference is unattractive because it signals low status, and this seems plausible to me. But the pitiful mortal would not have been rewarded for his brashness. How then do women gauge status and come to esteem one man rather than another?

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